ALAPAHA BLUE BLOOD BULLDOG (ABBB)

Origin and History

The exact origin of the Alapaha Blue Blood Bulldog (ABBB) is subject to quite a lot of controversy, as many breeders in the past have told different contradicting stories about how they originated. However in 1986, Ms. Lana Lou Lane contacted the Animal Research Foundation who had registered a number of rare breeds within the Foundation already. As she wanted to help promote the survival of the ABBB she became involved with their ARF Certified Breeder’s program.  She was the first officially recognised ARF Certified Breeder of Alapaha Blue Blood Bulldogs. Between 1986 and 2001, whilst Ms. Lana Lou was alive, she helped ensure just under 700 ABBB’s were registered or pedigreed with the ARF.

Appearance

The preferred ABBB coat colour is predominantly white with some coloured patches. These patches can be a variety of shades, such as red, fawn, brindle, chocolate brown, merie, blue or black. A dog that has more than 50% of colour versus white is also an acceptable coat, although an all white dog does tend to come last out of all the possible coat colours. Other common coat colours include white, blue spotting, black, and brown.

Temperament

The Alapahas are known for being fantastic companion dogs, that are not only loyal but also make excellent protection dogs. They have a power build, yet are agile and very athletic for their size. Some have claimed that they are aggressive but they typically only become so when they or their owners are under threat. Overall Alapaha Blue Blood Bulldogs are fairly docile, with a very sweet nature, but if necessary would not hesitate to defend their owner or family. They are naturally quite distrustful of strangers, but once they see their owner trusts and accepts them they will go back to their relaxed friendly state. 

AMERICAN BULLDOG

Origin and History

In the 17th and 18th century, the Old English Bulldog had migrated over to the united states and was used as cattle-driving and bull-baiting dogs, farm dogs, and butcher’s dogs.

In later years, states like Texas, had developed several separate strains of “bulldog” type dogs that were kept by ranchers as working dogs.

One of the most important jobs that the American Bulldog, which is likely the reason for its survival, was controlling the feral pigs. The bulldogs were commonly used to deal with vermin and were excellent at preventing the spread of feral pigs especially in the southern states.

American Bulldogs did come close to extinction but are now safe and their popularity has increased throughout the world, as a working and protective dog, as a family pet, and often as both.

Appearance

The American Bulldog is a very well built, stocky dog featuring a large head and muscular build. Generally the shoulders and chest will be the most defined muscular parts of the American Bulldog. They are a short-haired breed with typically smooth fur. They require very little maintenance, at most needing a bath every few weeks. Their colours, will usually be white with patches of red, black, or brindle, however if recent years they have even begun to grown in patterns including black, red, brown, fawn, and all shades of brindle.

Temperament

American Bulldogs are traditionally very confident, social and lively dogs that become relaxed and comfortable within their families. They develop a real strong bond with their owners, and love being showered with time and attention. As their ancestors were farm dogs who would guard the home, the livestock, and the family, they are naturally reserved and sometimes defensive towards strangers. However, once their owners have shown that their happy they will usually relax and be pleased to meet new people. Unlike some breeds they do not fully mature until the age of 2, those first years are very important as their training and exposure to people and other animals will determine their behaviour as mature dogs.

BULL TERRIER

Origin and History

During the early 19th century the bull and terrier breeds were developed to help with vermin control and to be used in animal-based blood sports. The ‘bull and terrier’ breed was based on the Old English Bulldog and Old English Terrier, with possible links to other terriers. Despite the fact that a cross between a bulldog and a terrier was considered to be of high value, no real efforts were made to preserve the original breed. The ‘bull and terrier’ eventually became the ‘Bull Terriers’ and ‘Staffordshire Bull Terriers’ which were both smaller than their predecessor and easier to handle.

Throughout the mid-19th century a gentleman named James Hinks started breeding bull and terriers with ‘English White Terriers’ (now extinct), looking for a cleaner appearance, he wished the dogs to be all-white, with a better leg profile and nicer head shape. Unfortunately all-white breeding began to cause several medical problems. Ted Lyon, as well as other breeders, started to introduce other colours, breeding with the Staffordshire Bull Terriers in the early 20th century.

Appearance

Without a doubt the Bull Terrier’s most recognisable feature is its ‘egg-shaped head’, because by the way the profile curves gently downwards from the top of the skull down to the tip of the nose. Their lower jaw is deep and very strong. Also unique to the Bull Terrier are their triangular eyes, which are small and deep-set. They have a full, rounded body, with strong and muscular shoulders. Unlike their early breeding, they are bred in a variety of colours either white, fawn, brindle, red, black or a combination of several of these colours.

Temperament

Origin and History

During the early 19th century the bull and terrier breeds were developed to help with vermin control and to be used in animal-based blood sports. The ‘bull and terrier’ breed was based on the Old English Bulldog and Old English Terrier, with possible links to other terriers. Despite the fact that a cross between a bulldog and a terrier was considered to be of high value, no real efforts were made to preserve the original breed. The ‘bull and terrier’ eventually became the ‘Bull Terriers’ and ‘Staffordshire Bull Terriers’ which were both smaller than their predecessor and easier to handle.

Throughout the mid-19th century a gentleman named James Hinks started breeding bull and terriers with ‘English White Terriers’ (now extinct), looking for a cleaner appearance, he wished the dogs to be all-white, with a better leg profile and nicer head shape. Unfortunately all-white breeding began to cause several medical problems. Ted Lyon, as well as other breeders, started to introduce other colours, breeding with the Staffordshire Bull Terriers in the early 20th century.

Appearance

Without a doubt the Bull Terrier’s most recognisable feature is its ‘egg-shaped head’, because by the way the profile curves gently downwards from the top of the skull down to the tip of the nose. Their lower jaw is deep and very strong. Also unique to the Bull Terrier are their triangular eyes, which are small and deep-set. They have a full, rounded body, with strong and muscular shoulders. Unlike their early breeding, they are bred in a variety of colours either white, fawn, brindle, red, black or a combination of several of these colours.

Temperament

The Bull Terrier is not considered a good choice for inexperienced owners as they can be a stubborn breed. Although they can be obstinate, they are described by a well known Bull Terrier club as particularly good with people. With early socialisation they can be great with other animals and children. They have a very big personality and are known for being courageous, fun and a perfect family member. Generally they live for anywhere between 10 to 15 years and are very loyal companions. Although the breed has been a target of breed-specific legislation, several studies have shown that their overall temperament is not dissimilar to that of a golden retriever.

OLDE ENGLISH BULLDOGGE

Origin and History

The development of the Olde English Bulldogge was an attempt to recreate the “Regency Period Bull Baiter”. Having only been bred since the 1970s they are a relatively new breed that was developed by David Leavitt, in Coatesville, PA. Leavitt began his project with the goal of creating a dog with many of the original characteristics of the original bull-baiting dogs, but having a much less aggressive temperament. After many planned and carefully bred crosses the Olde English Bulldogge began to breed true.

Appearance

The Olde English Bulldogge is a medium-sized dog with a muscular build. This gives them great strength, yet they remain agile in their movement. They are very well proportioned and have great balance. They are also able to perform well without suffering any breathing restrictions in heat or in cold temperatures.

Recognised colour patterns include brindle and solid colours (with or without white patches).

Temperament

They’re known to be courageous and loyal with a calm, stable temperament. They feel naturally protective towards children and fit in to families very well. They have a heart of gold which they wear on their doggy sleeve. Whenever you have to tell them off, expect to see a little hurt look on their face … they may even turn away and ignore you until they get over it!

FRENCH BULLDOG

Origin and History

Believe it or not the modern French Bulldog descends directly from the Molossians, which is an ancient Greek tribe. In history the dogs were spread by traders through the ancient world.

The French Bulldog has been bred as a domestic dog. They were developed by crossing Toy Bulldogs imported from England and France, in the 1800s. Really they were bred to be companion dogs.

Appearance

The French Bulldog is a Bulldog in miniature, except for the breed’s trademark feature, their wonderfully cute bat-like ears. They are little stocky dogs with a lovely friendly mild temperament. Beneath their smooth coat you’ll find a compact muscular build with a flat, short coat. Common colours include fawn, white and different versions of brindle shown on their short, flat hair.

Unfortunately as a consequence of selective breeding that has be done in the past they are prone to many health issues.  The most common disorders include ear infections, diarrhoea and conjunctivitis. They also suffer with skin problems and can need a lot of extra care, especially as they grow old. Although the have an excellent temperament, due the extra care they often need, you need to make sure you have the time and resources to fully look after them before you consider making the Frenchie part of your family.

Temperament

Like most companion dogs they love close contact with humans. If left alone, even for a few hours, they can experience separation anxiety. This can be particularly prominent when they are puppies but usually continues through into to adulthood. Due to this anxiety, it is not uncommon for them to act out whilst you are away. You may find that they void their toilet training and generally make a mess, some even bark until you return, but this is only because they can’t bear to be away from you. You can do things to help this, like create a room or an environment that they become used to being in on their own. From puppies you could shut them in this space for short periods of time whilst you are in the house, make it fun with toys, a bed, water and the occasionally treat. They will grow to trust this space and hopefully will not feel so alone when you have to leave them. Same as with most dogs, how you raise them from a pup helps them to become better mature dogs. Socialising your Frenchie from a young age, with other people and dogs, will help them not to develop anxiety when meeting new friends as they get older.

STAFFORDSHIRE BULL TERRIER

Origin and History

Similarly to the other ‘bull breeds’ backstory, a few centuries ago, when dog-oriented blood sports were the rage, many breeds were developed to compete in these sports. Although most are now extinct, the Staffordshire Bull Terrier, was perfected in the mid-19th century by James Hinks, and has become one of the long-standing and most successful breeds.

Appearance

For it’s size the Staffordshire Bull Terrier should be of great strength and, despite their muscular build, should remain active and agile. They have a smooth-coat that will usually be red, fawn, white, black or blue. Any of these colours may be mixed with white.

Temperament

Staffordshire Bull Terriers are known for being courageous, highly intelligent, and tenacious. Along with these traits they are wonderfully affectionate towards their family and are especially loving towards children. They are trustworthy and have a very stable nature making them a great all-round dog.

CANE CORSO

Origin and History

Originally from Italy the Cane Corso is a Mastiff-type breed that descended from Roman war dogs. Once the Roman Empire fell, they were used to work as a farmhand, guard flocks, hunt, and to protect property and their family. With an influx in industry the breed almost died out over the world wars. By the 1970s very few dogs remained, and they were only found in southern Italy. In 1973 Giovanni Bonnetti, who fondly remembered the dogs from his childhood, wanted to ensure their survival so contacted Dr. Paolo Breber. By the next year a breeding program had begun. The breed was then recognised by the Federation Cynologique Internationale in 1996. Since then they have grown in popularity all over the world.

Appearance

The Cane Corso has a short coat which is stiff, shiny with a light undercoat that will become thicker to protect them in cold weather.
The usual colours are black, shades of grey, fawn and red. Solid fawn, red and brindle, are also acceptable colours, and dogs may have a black or grey mask. Possible markings include a white patch on the chest, throat, chin, backs of the pasterns, and on their toes.

Temperament

Despite their big, muscly appearance, they are gentle giants at heart. They will fiercely perfect their owners, and love to show them affection. They are also a highly intelligent breed.

AMERICAN BULLY

Origin and History

Between 1980 and 1990, using the American Staffordshire Terriers and American Pit Bull Terriers the American Bully was born in the USA. They were created to be a family companion dog.

Appearance

They have several recognised breed variations Standard, Pocket, XL and Classic. One of the American Bully’s most defining features is their intimidating and thick-muscled body. There is a massive variation between heights, weights and general appearance in the new breed.

Temperament

Having a much more docile nature than their ancient ancestors, the American Bully is a very adaptable breed, often acting as a loving companion. Like many other bull breeds, despite acting as lapdog, does very well in sports such as weight pull, making them a versatile pet.

BANDOGGE/BANDOG

Origin and History

Bandogge is a general term for the non-pure breed molloser type breeds. The term is believed to have originated from the Middle Ages in England. It’s mostly used as a general term to describe the cross of an American Pitbull Terrier and a Mastiff (any kind) or an American Bulldog and a Mastiff (any kind). Over the years there became so many different cross-breeds that they were grouped into one category: the Bandogge.

Appearance

They have a variety of appearances depending on their cross-breed, which will include many variations of the dogs described above.

Temperament

Their temperament again does depend on the cross-breed, however they are usually loyal, strong and dedicated dogs.

DORSET OLDE TYME BULLDOGGE

Origin and History

The Dorset Old Tyme Bulldogge was another very recently developed breed.  Being bred by Steve Barnett in the late 1980’s. He also wanted to create his ideal bulldog based on the original breeds. His aim was to produce a national bulldog. A dog that you’d be proud to have be your side, confident in his abilities and able to trust his temperament.

Appearance

The Dorset Olde Tyme Bulldogge is a medium size dog that has a powerful stance, displaying pride. confidence and fearlessness. Although they are of a docile nature, they will remain alert, ready to respond to their owner. They have a well-proportioned body, being stocky and very muscular. A true powerhouse, their beautifully athletic physique will attract admiring glances wherever they go.

Temperament

A great bonus with the Dorset Olde Tyme Bulldogge is that their relaxed temperament means they are great around other animals, especially when well socialised from a puppy.

Being the absolute powerhouse that they are the Bulldogge can handle any amount of exercise. If you are a very active person or have a more laid back lifestyle, this may be the perfect dog for you, happy to lay by your feet or run at your side. You will find them an excellent companion, always ready to show you love and affection.

 

A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE BULL BREED AND MOLLOSER DOGS

The bull breed dogs get their heritage from Bull and Mastiff type dogs from history, with indefinite origins.

 Modern bull breeds have all descended down from these original Bull and Mastiff breeds via breeding programs. These programmes created the Alapaha Blue Blood Bulldog, American Bulldog, Aussie Bulldog, Banter Bulldogge, Buldogue Campeiro, Ca de Bou, Catahoula bulldog, Dorset Olde Tyme Bulldog, English Bulldog, French Bulldog, Olde English Bulldogge, Olde Boston Bulldogge, Victorian Bulldog, Valley Bulldog. All of these breeds have traits close to the ancient bull breeds, even with their new living conditions.

Historically the bull breeds came from the molossian dogs and fighting dog breeds. There were two types of fighting dogs the smaller breeds used for herding and protecting livestock and the larger Mastiff guard dogs. Before the 1800s when bull fights when banned they were very popular, the bull breeds were selected for their perfect build to attack the bull and hang on without losing its grip. Unlike many other dog breeds that would just slash at the bulls.

The Molossians breeds themselves were said to have come from Epirus in the northwest of Greece, their name refers to the Molossi tribes which they were associated with, but their true origin is unknown. The Molossi people kept guard, war dogs which were famous for their great courage and ferocity. They became known as the “Canis Molossi”, dogs of the Molossi. It is popular opinion that the Molossi were the early, more ferocious precursors of the mastiffs and  directly descendant from the Tibetan mastiff, before they were brought over to Greece.

However the true origin of the Molosser breeds is still unknown. According to legend they descended from a dog named Laeleps. Hephaestus forged Laeleps from Demonesian bronze, placed a soul into it, and gave it to Zeus. After being passed along through many owners, it turned to stone, but not before it had helped produce a race of mighty dogs. These mighty dogs would be the distant ancestors of the Molloser and Bull Breeds that we know today.

In a letter sent by San Sebastian in 1632 to Mr P. Eaton, the first recorded use of the word ‘Bulldoggs’ appears. It reads “a good Mastire dog, a case of liquor and I beg you to get for me some good bulldoggs”, here the Bulldog is clearly spoken of individually and separate from the Mastiff. Therefore is is evident the ‘mighty dogs’ had began to change and become human companions, working and fighting dogs.